Can Anyone Learn To Sing?

 by Terri Paglusch

If you could wave a magic wand and give yourself a better singing voice, would you do so? My guess is you're nodding your head. Most people want this, because singing is fun, creative, and social. Now, I'm sorry for the bad news but I don't have a magic wand. However, if you really want to learn to sing better, I do know a way.

Many people, children and adults alike, assume they're simply resigned to missing out on the fun of singing because of bad luck.


Many people, children and adults alike, assume that they are simply resigned to missing out on the fun of singing because of bad luck. By the time we're ten years old, we already have an opinion about whether we can sing or not. And those that feel they are not "gifted" in this way often stop singing altogether. You'll hear them say "I have a terrible voice," or "I can't sing a note." But does this really have to be the final verdict?

More often than not, if you can speak you should also be able to learn to improve your singing voice. Please note that this isn't a promise that you'll end up sounding like Adele or Josh Groban after a few months. Through proper technique training and lots of practice, anyone can learn to be a better singer. 

More often than not, if you can speak you should also be able to learn to improve your singing voice.


There's no doubt that some people have an advantage with singing. They might have a physical advantage based on the structure of their larynx and vocal chords, or they may have been exposed to music at a young age, or play a musical instrument. Each of these possibilities have been shown to be beneficial in developing a good singing voice. If you don't fall into any of these categories, never fear. This is not a sign that you've missed your chance to be a singer.


If you're serious about improving your voice, your first step should be to get some training. A good vocal teacher will help you learn to use your singing voice (we all have one!). They'll also show you how to use your body properly to produce sound. Pitch matching, breath support, and creating proper vowel sounds can all be learned. Then on to the fun part: practice, and lots of it. Just as your body needs to be conditioned to improve in sports, you also need to learn how to use proper techniques for singing. It's up to you to put in the time conditioning your voice. Sticking to a daily practice schedule will give you the best results.

You can't expect miraculous results overnight, but with good instruction and lots of practice, even you can learn to be a better singer. Why not give voice lessons a try?




Written by
Terri Paglusch

Terri paglusch

Terri comes to Music House with extensive experience in business management. At Music House she spends her time working to make the client experience the best it can be.